Post(s) tagged with "western han"

fyeahasianhistory:

Female Sleeve Dancer
Western Han Dynasty (206 BCE - CE 8)
Earthenware, pigment.

fyeahasianhistory:

Female Sleeve Dancer

Western Han Dynasty (206 BCE - CE 8)

Earthenware, pigment.

Detail of a “feathered immortal” (羽人) riding a dragon on a mural from a late Western Han (202 BC - 9 AD) tomb discovered in Xi’an in 2004.
Scanned from “Wen Wu” (文物) 2006 no.5 page 26

Detail of a “feathered immortal” (羽人) riding a dragon on a mural from a late Western Han (202 BC - 9 AD) tomb discovered in Xi’an in 2004.

Scanned from “Wen Wu” (文物) 2006 no.5 page 26

themedvedable:

A Set of Four Painted Bronze Mat Weights in the form of Liubo Players Western Han Dynasty (206 B.C. – A.D. 8) Heights 2¾  inches – 3⅜ inches (7 cm – 8.6 cm) Courtesy of J.J. Lally & Co.
Source: The Curated Object

themedvedable:

A Set of Four Painted Bronze Mat Weights in the form of Liubo Players Western Han Dynasty (206 B.C. – A.D. 8) Heights 2¾  inches – 3⅜ inches (7 cm – 8.6 cm) Courtesy of J.J. Lally & Co.

Source: The Curated Object

(Source: old-glory)

aubriepository:

Female Dancer, Western Han dynasty (206 B.C.–A.D. 9), Charlotte C. and John C. Weber Collection

aubriepository:

Female Dancer, Western Han dynasty (206 B.C.–A.D. 9), Charlotte C. and John C. Weber Collection

(via aubriepository-deactivated20120)

picture by *Tigermyuou
The Four Great Beauties of Ancient China
The Four Beauties are four ancient Chinese women renowned for their beauty. The scarcity of historical records concerning them meant that much of what is known of them today has been greatly embellished by legend. They gained their reputation from the influence they exercised over kings and emperors and consequently, the way their actions impacted Chinese history. Three of the Four Great Beauties brought kingdoms to their knees, and the lives of all four ended in tragedy or under mysterious circumstances.
Xi Shi (c. seventh to sixth century BC, Spring and Autumn Period), said to be so entrancingly beautiful that fish would forget how to swim and sink away from the surface when she walks by.
Wang Zhaojun (c. first century BC, Western Han Dynasty), said to be so beautiful that her appearance would entice birds in flight to fall from the sky.
Diaochan (c. third century, Late Eastern Han/Three Kingdoms period), said to be so luminously lovely that the moon itself would shy away in embarrassment when compared to her face.
Yang Guifei (719–756, Tang Dynasty), said to have a face that puts all flowers to shame.

picture by *Tigermyuou

The Four Great Beauties of Ancient China

The Four Beauties are four ancient Chinese women renowned for their beauty. The scarcity of historical records concerning them meant that much of what is known of them today has been greatly embellished by legend. They gained their reputation from the influence they exercised over kings and emperors and consequently, the way their actions impacted Chinese history. Three of the Four Great Beauties brought kingdoms to their knees, and the lives of all four ended in tragedy or under mysterious circumstances.

Xi Shi (c. seventh to sixth century BC, Spring and Autumn Period), said to be so entrancingly beautiful that fish would forget how to swim and sink away from the surface when she walks by.

Wang Zhaojun (c. first century BC, Western Han Dynasty), said to be so beautiful that her appearance would entice birds in flight to fall from the sky.

Diaochan (c. third century, Late Eastern Han/Three Kingdoms period), said to be so luminously lovely that the moon itself would shy away in embarrassment when compared to her face.

Yang Guifei (719–756, Tang Dynasty), said to have a face that puts all flowers to shame.

Servant and adviser from lower or middle class; Xi’an, Western Han Dynasty

Servant and adviser from lower or middle class; Xi’an, Western Han Dynasty

Gilt Bronze Human-Shaped Lamp, made in the Western Han Dynasty, dated 172 BC. It is a Grade I antique in China, and is now stored in the Hebei Museum.

On page 100 of his book Han Civilization (1982), archaeologist and historian Wang Zhongshu states this about the lamp found in Dou Wan’s tomb:

The best-known item among them in the Mancheng find was the Changxin Palace lamp, gilded with bright gold, in the form of a kneeling palace maid holding the lamp in her hands. Not only was the palace maid beautifully sculptured, the lamp and its cover were cleverly designed so that both the lamp’s illuminating power and the direction of its rays were (and still are) adjustable. Since the smoke was absorbed into the body of the maid through her arms, it was in fact an antipollution design.

Gilt Bronze Human-Shaped Lamp, made in the Western Han Dynasty, dated 172 BC. It is a Grade I antique in China, and is now stored in the Hebei Museum.

On page 100 of his book Han Civilization (1982), archaeologist and historian Wang Zhongshu states this about the lamp found in Dou Wan’s tomb:

The best-known item among them in the Mancheng find was the Changxin Palace lamp, gilded with bright gold, in the form of a kneeling palace maid holding the lamp in her hands. Not only was the palace maid beautifully sculptured, the lamp and its cover were cleverly designed so that both the lamp’s illuminating power and the direction of its rays were (and still are) adjustable. Since the smoke was absorbed into the body of the maid through her arms, it was in fact an antipollution design.

Naked servants (the wooden arms and the silk clothing have perished); Xi’an; Western Han Dynasty

Naked servants (the wooden arms and the silk clothing have perished); Xi’an; Western Han Dynasty


This 6¾ foot long Western Han painting on silk was found draped over the coffin in the grave of Lady Dai (c. 168 BC) at Mawangdui near Changsha in Hunan province, China. The scenes depicted on it seem to illustrate the journey of the woman’s soul. The top section shows the heavenly realm, complete with dragons, leopards, and hybrid creatures. At the corners are the crow that symbolizes the sun and the toad that symbolizes the moon, the pairing of the sun and moon representing the cosmic forces of yin and yang.

This 6¾ foot long Western Han painting on silk was found draped over the coffin in the grave of Lady Dai (c. 168 BC) at Mawangdui near Changsha in Hunan province, China. The scenes depicted on it seem to illustrate the journey of the woman’s soul. The top section shows the heavenly realm, complete with dragons, leopards, and hybrid creatures. At the corners are the crow that symbolizes the sun and the toad that symbolizes the moon, the pairing of the sun and moon representing the cosmic forces of yin and yang.